Freelancing: feast versus famine.

freelance blog post

It’s coming up to roughly a year since I started freelancing as a radio person* and I have truly discovered what people mean when they describe it as feast or famine. Fortunately when I started I was still studying so money wasn’t so much an issue, but soon after moving into a new flat and for once being truly self-sustaining I did have a panic that I wasn’t going to earn enough and started working some part-time jobs in waiting and bar work just to top up the rent money. Summer suddenly became quite manic, it slowed down a lot again around Christmas, but throughout February I have been working double shifts.

I wanted to write a quick post about how I both love and hate freelancing at the same time. On the one hand it’s great, I get to work with a variety of stations, and do so many different things each day and I can never complain of getting bored or finding myself typecast to one role when I am still working out what I am best at. However, I would love to be able to feel a lot more secure in what work I am doing, when I am next getting paid and when my car decides to breakdown at 5am on a dual carriageway on my way to work I know that I’m not going to look unreliable.

What really spurred this blog post though is the fact that today I got my first pass to Radio Solent, and I am starting to work on a lot more of their programmes – so I feel like I am making progress. Unfortunately now I just have to be able to control my habit of saying yes to everything to make sure, like my car, I don’t conk out at 5am on the roadside.

*Mainly as a broadcast journalist, but now as a voice coach, broadcast assistant, and social media manager.

Freelance roster

Who I am working with LEFT TO RIGHT: Bournemouth University, voice coach; Wessex FM, broadcast journalist; Jack FM, broadcast journalist; Hot Radio, presenter and broadcast journalist; Approved Family Friendly, social media manager, BBC Radio Solent, broadcast assistant; Fire Radio, broadcast journalist; Spire FM, broadcast journalist; and The Breeze, broadcast journalist.

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WALKING ON-AIR: How to be a radio presenter

I’d like to first start and say no, I am not starting to dish out advice on how to be a radio presenter, but I have found some people who are.

I’ve been a presenter now for five years and I am nowhere near done learning. So it’s books like this which can be really helpful to keep around to guide your style as you learn.

walking on air

Ideal for:

  • Hospital Radio Presenters
  • Budding Radio management
  • Community Radio Broadcasters
  • Mobile, Bar or Club DJs
  • Actors or musicians, or acts
  • Voices or voice overs
  • Nosey people
  • People from an entertainment background
  • People with an interest in becoming a radio DJ
  • Anoraks

…and I think I count for at least 8 out of ten of these.
To get your mitts on this useful page turner visit their site radio-presenter.com  and send them a tweet @Radio_Talent_UK